The United Nations General Assembly adopted by consensus a resolution declaring May 20 as World Bee Day. Every year on this day, the attention of the global public will be drawn to the importance of preserving bees and other pollinators.

 

Background

Last December, after years of solicitation and effort, the Slovenian Government and their Beekeeping Association persuaded the United Nations General Assembly to adopt a resolution declaring May 20 as World Bee Day. Every year on this day, the attention of the global public will be drawn to the importance of preserving bees and other pollinators. 

Bee pollination is foundation of biodiversity on our planet. Most our fruit, nuts berries veggies, coffee, cotton, chocolate and even dairy come directly or indirectly from bee and other insect pollination. Therefore bees bring abundance to crops which provide income for farmers. According to the international study of Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) in 2016 nearly $500 billion of annual global food production relies on direct contributions by pollinators.

Bee pollination is cornerstone of nature. In Darwin’s seminal book Origin of Species he wrote that if flowering grasses bees had not co-evolved precisely the same time, our planet and therefore us, would not be. Bees are fundamental in sustaining biodiversity and maintaining our natural habitat. Bees are a bioindicator of environmental conditions. Through observation of their development and health status, we can determine when something is happening in the environment and if there is a need to take action. If we do not react to these warnings, the later consequences will become dire. 

We have a moral obligation to ensure our future generations have a clean and healthy environment and diverse and nutrient-rich foods available, for which bees and other pollinators play an important role.
— Dejan Židan, MSc. Deputy Prime Minister of the Republic of Slovenia